Experience Plus!

Bicycle Tours Since 1972

Experience Plus - Bicycle Tours since 1972

Parmesan and Radicchio Salad

by Paola - Tuesday, July 27, 2010 recipes

Parmesan and Radicchio Salad

Radicchio is a very prevalent Italian winter vegetable (mostly grown October through February in north-eastern Italy) and comes in several different shapes and sizes—almost always red and white, but also cream with specks of red or green with red highlights. Any red and white radicchio (Trevigiano, Chioggia, Verona) will work in this recipe. Something delightfully delicious happens when you combine a bitter green with an aged cheese. This recipe modifies another one that we love, which uses arugula (or rocket lettuce), slices of parmesan cheese on top of cured beef.  Both are an easy way to spruce up a dinner with a colorful new dish!

1 head of radicchio
3-4 tbsp of grated Parmigiano Reggiano or other quality parmesan cheese
Extra virgin olive oil, vinegar, salt to taste (approximately 1.5-2 tbsp of olive oil, ½-1 tbsp of vinegar)
Optional, but highly recommended:  1-2 tbsp of ground walnuts or pecans

Wash and chop the radicchio into bite size pieces. Dress with olive oil, vinegar and salt to taste. Sprinkle the grated parmesan onto the dressed salad and toss. The cheese should be enough to coat the leaves fairly substantially. Sprinkle the grated walnut or pecans over everything, toss and serve.

Buon Appetito!

A favorite side dish for ExperiencePlus! staff in Italy.

Paola - Paola Malpezzi-Price was co-founder of ExperiencePlus! Specialty Tours, and now advisor to Monica and Maria Elena as they run ExperiencePlus! Bicycle Tours. Paola retired in May 2014 from being the Chair of the Foreign Languages and Literature department and teaching French literature and culture, Italian literature and culture in translation and Women's Studies courses at Colorado State University. She has published two books: Lucrezia Marinella and the "Querelle des Femmes" in Seventeenth-Century Italy (2007) and Moderata Fonte - Women and Life in Sixteenth-century Venice (2003), both by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.